Another Wonder Woman

A darker look that more resembles Gal than Lynda. Circa 2003.

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Wonder Woman. Pencil on 9×12 board. $200.

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Work Break

Drawn while taking a break from an advertising project, circa 2002.

Scan_hobo-smPencil on 8.5″ x 11″ bond paper. $200, Inquire.

Jeanette, Paul and Jim

Martin Pasko and I collaborated on a few issues of Kobra back in 1976, including one that co-starred Batman in 5 Star Super Hero Spectacular. We connected some years ago towards DC Comics’ reprinting of these issues. We’ve also exchanged a few comments on Facebook posts. The most recent was in relation to Jeanette Kahn, Paul Levitz and Jim Shooter – and their contribution to comics at the helm of DC and Marvel since the 1970’s. Below are snippets from that thread, posted here for posterity.  Continue reading “Jeanette, Paul and Jim”

Donovan Flint | Star Hunters

In the fall of 1977, I penciled one issue (#3) of a new sci-fi series for DC Comics, created by David MicheleneDon Newton and Bob Layton titled Star Hunters. The cover and a panel from that issue appear below.

40 years later, this recent commission of Donovan Flint, lead protagonist. 13″x 20″, India ink and Gesso.

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Bjorn Borg | 1977

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Soon after finishing this Bjorn Borg color spread for Crawdaddy Magazine in the summer of 1977, I took a long break from comics and never saw the issue published. Just found an affordable copy on Ebay.

At about 22 years old when it was done, barely 2 years into  professional work, I remember delivering the large art to Crawdaddy, whose offices were in the same building as Marvel’s . Jim Starlin was in the lobby, leaving the building and asked if there’s new art on the board I’m carrying. I showed it to him and he thought for a second and said: “You’re too good for comics.” I didn’t think so but appreciated the compliment.

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Vatican Museums Adopt a Comic Book

Chaplin_sI remember an excitement in the comics community in the mid-1970’s when we heard that a Robert Crumb original was to be displayed in Paris’ Louvre Museum. A first of a kind event for a medium mostly shunned by culture venues of that era.

My recent oil painting of Charlie Chaplin is an effort to extend the drawing horizons past the comics aesthetic. Not especially driven by wanting the drawing to be more “artistic”, but rather an exploration of areas beyond the comic book drawing method instilled in me since youth.

I’m now on my second painting and this time it’s a comics-based commission that I’ll post when done.  Continue reading “Vatican Museums Adopt a Comic Book”